For The Love Of Pete (Pete Shelley)

The shocking, premature death of Pete Shelley of Buzzcocks on the 6th of December upset myself & many others. His smart, vulnerable, romantic lyrics matched to a crisp, exhilarating, distinctive sound made for Pop-Punk perfection which, as you know, retains its spark & appeal 40 years on. My friend Raymond Gorman, himself a guitarist/songwriter of note with That Petrol Emotion & The Everlasting Yeah, posted this thoughtful, personal tribute on Facebook. It deserves a more permanent place than a social media feed & Loosehandlebars is not only that place but also pleased to welcome a new contributor.

 

 

Image result for buzzcocks howard devotoBuzzcocks meant the world to me when I was young and I got to meet Pete on more than a few occasions. Always truly lovely, sweet, funny and happy to chat. Imagine meeting your heroes and you find out they’re as wonderful as you thought. He even gave me his phone number but I was always too starstruck to actually ever call him. Bassist Steve Garvey was always a real gent to us/me as well. The records they made before the initial split with Martin Rushent, the best producer whose contribution should not be overlooked, were perfect.

 

 

THAT SOUND. I learned to play chords playing along with the Ramones but my playing really came on more when I started to play along with Buzzcocks. I had a small practice amp and a cheap crappy Satellite guitar (straight from Kay’s catalogue which I bought using my paper round money – £1 for 100 weeks). and suddenly I could play all the spidery lead lines on “Another Music in a Different Kitchen”. I grew up in a very macho, violent environment and I wasn’t like that so Pete’s vocals and lyrics weren’t alien to me plus I’d already been softened up by Bowie and Bolan. For someone who wrote poetry in secret (yeah like I’m gonna advertise that as a teen in Derry, Northern Ireland!)

 

buzzcocksI thought for the first time that maybe I could maybe give lyrics a go too. After all as Pete once said himself: “I never knew there was a law against sounding vulnerable.” Buzzcock’s heyday didn’t last that long. I remember when they started to go out of favour and was incredulous when “You Say You Don’t Love Me” wasn’t their biggest single to date and even though their star waned I still bought all their other records and the C81 tape too for “I Look Alone”. When That Petrol Emotion were looking for a singer we put an ad in New Musical Express and one of the influences we looked for was Buzzcocks.

 

 

Related imageTPE covered “Fiction Romance” when I was still the singer and later we also did a faithful but killer version of “Nothing Left”. Our label was called “Noise-A-Noise”. What is “Can’t Stop” but John and I trying to write a Buzzcocks song?? So it’s sad that Pete’s gone. I was pleased to read in an interview that he still liked champagne and seemed to be in good form. It’s wonderful that he was able to make a living for so long and in no way complained that they should have had more success. He was a true punk (with a library card) and a true trailblazer of the DIY spirit that fuelled that movement. He helped me find my own voice and a raison d’etre. He was also a seeker of truth. I learned of his interest in Eastern philosophy and the Zen tradition and then read up some myself. He was erudite and articulate. Highly intelligent but suspicious of intellectualism. More than anything though he was a bloody brilliant and talented human. I’ll miss him loads. “Everything is and that is why it is” will be the line.

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Put On Your Wig Woman (Junior Walker)

As the 1950’s headed towards the 1960’s songwriter Berry Gordy was doing nicely from his connection with singer Jackie Wilson (Berry wrote “Reet Petite”, “Lonely Teardrops” & others) while having a shrewd eye on the business of music through an involvement with talent he found in his hometown Detroit. His Tamla label released its first disc in 1959, the Miracles’ “Shop Around” became its first million seller the following year & the Motown Record Corporation would soon stake a claim to be “the sound of young America”, as big an influence on the decade’s popular music as the British Beat explosion.

 

Image result for junior walker & the all-stars come seeWe all know the great stars signed to the label, Marvin, Stevie, Diana & the Supremes, the Four Tops, the Temptations. There were plenty of other acts who benefited & contributed to the Motown sound. That driving beat of the house band, the Funk Brothers, matched to a melodic & lyrical acuity & urbanity placed African-American music firmly in the Modernist movement of the decade. Pop Art…you betcha! Junior Walker, a saxophonist, a little older than the others, never really adhered to the Hitsville formula but he & his All Stars enjoyed much success because their distinctive, individual style was pretty irresistible.

 

 

Image result for junior walker concert posterJunior Walker, born in 1931, was playing in bands in Battle Creek, Michigan, 120 miles east of Detroit, in the mid-1950s. The All Stars played both kinds of music, the Rhythm & the Blues, tenor sax playing Junior being influenced by the Jive of Louis Jordan & the Jazz of Illinois Jacquet (great name). The band signed with Harvey Fuqua, a singer turned label head, whose hits with the Moonglows, the classic “Sincerely” & the extra classic “The 10 Commandments of Love” were as good as Doo Wop got. Harvey was Berry Gordy’s brother in law & when he joined the family company he took his roster with him. The second 45 issued under the growing Motown umbrella found Junior Walker & the All Stars at the top of the R&B charts & in the Pop Top 10, a list that was pretty much all British Invasion & Tamla.

 

Image result for junior walker roadrunnerOn “Shotgun” (coming up later) the band were augmented by a Funk Brothers backline, including the peerless bassist James Jamerson. It’s a Soul Explosion, the honking sax, call & response vocal shouts & a demand that you dance urgency is the trademark of Junior Walker & the All Stars. Gritty is not the adjective most associated with Detroit at this time, these guys were, they found an audience & Motown let them do their thing. “(I’m A) Roadrunner”, the 4th Top 10 R&B 45, was written by ace team Holland-Dozier-Holland, another injection of Soul adrenaline, a super smash. King Curtis & Cannonball Adderley were masters of Soul/R&B saxophone & Junior Walker was not only just as groovy but his records were a whole lot of fun.

 

 

Image result for junior walker & the all-stars come seeThe major influence of the label on the artist was to point him towards the cupboard where they kept their back catalogue. First, in 1966, Marvin’s “How Sweet It Is (to be Loved by You)” & “Money (That’s What I Want)” were Walkerfied. The following year H-D-H’s hit for the Supremes, “Come See About Me” was given a gutbucket revival, guaranteed to pack out any dancefloor anywhere. In the UK Junior Walker was a major Mod favourite. His records may not have made Top of the Pops but were played on the pirate radio stations & were essentials for any DJ in clubs (in my case youth clubs) all over the country. The ones already checked, “Shake & Fingerpop”, “Pucker Up Buttercup”, the killer “Shoot Your Shot”, it’s becoming a list & we knew them all.

 

In 1969 Walker & his producer Johnny Bristol, an ally since before Motown, changed it up & had a big success. “What Does It Take (To Win Your Love)”, written by Bristol, Fuqua & staffer Vernon Bullock, was recorded in 1968 for the “Home Cookin'” LP & released with some reluctance by the label. It’s slower paced, the edges are smoothed, the vocal more featured & it sold a million. Followed by a fine cover of the Guess Who’s “These Eyes” this new style kept Junior in the game, away from the golden oldie circuit in the new decade.

 

 

Image result for junior walker concert posterJunior Walker came out of the Jumping Jive R&B tradition & found his place in Soul music. He had international success with his records & the evidence is that his live shows were not to be missed. If, in June 1969, you were at the Fillmore West in San Francisco for the All Stars/Grateful Dead double bill then I am jealous. The group were regular, popular visitors to the UK & this clip (in colour!) of their 1967 gig at the Ram Jam Club, you know it, on the Brixton Rd, above Burton’s & the gas showroom, yeah you know, is just wonderful. Junior & his band, Willie Woods, guitar, James Graves, drums & Vic Thomas, organ, (bassist unknown) blow up an absolute storm. If I ever get this time machine finished then look out for me in the audience the next time you watch this lovely thing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Running Into The Sun But I’m Running Behind ( Jackson Browne)

There was a time, long ago it seems now, when Jackson Browne was telling it just like I thought it was. It was my first year at university when his debut LP, which I’ve always known as “Saturate Before Using”, came around in 1972. I’d just had a taste of something fine & so had Jackson, his stoned, romantic contemplation was much more eloquently expressed than my own (come on, I was still a teenager!). The Asylum label were assembling a company of Los Angeles troubadours, Jackson & Joni leading the way. A strong collection of mature-beyond-his-years songs combined with uncluttered arrangements played by the new session hotshots, the Section, hit the spot then &, when I hear “Song For Adam”, “Doctor My Eyes”, by him or the Jackson 5, & “Rock Me on the Water”, still does. Earlier this year Jackson got the band back together for some award show or other & it sounded pretty good. They are a little older now but hey, aren’t we all?

 

 

The following 3 LPs established Browne in the top tier. I wore out my  copy of “For Everyman” (1973) & bought a replacement.  Now there’s a CD on the shelf, I’ve had good value from all of them. His finely wrought observations on the effect of Love, Life & Loss on the ideals of the Sixties generation, “caught between the longing for love & the struggle for the legal tender”, were judicious & accurate. The very talented guitarist David Lindley’s sympathetic contribution to the music improved things even more. It’s another time for an appreciation of these records & perhaps the reasons I don’t really play them so much nowadays because this is about the next one up, an album that still gets a regular hearing around here.

 

Related image“Running On Empty” (1977) is a live album, 10 tracks, none of which had appeared on previous records. After 4 well-received, big selling records Jackson Browne was well set for a “Best of…” collection. In late 1976 I had seen an outstanding performance which included all the good ones & I’m sure I’m not the only one who would have been happy to handed over the hard-earned for live versions of songs already in my collection. Jackson knew better & what we got for our money was something a little more substantial.

 

 

“Running On Empty” is a diary of the tour he did in August/September 1977; the first time he was in a position to prise the Section away from a busy studio schedule. An “audio verite” of life on the road, recordings were made onstage, in rehearsal & hotel rooms, even on the Continental Silver Eagle band bus. Recording engineer Greg Ladanyi must have been kept busy having the appropriate gear on hand for whatever the situation, whenever time of night the magic was ready to go down. He is one of the stars of the record, it is the immediacy, informality & intimacy of the collection that makes it such a success.

 

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Browne hadn’t enough material for a full album, only 2 of the 10 tracks are solely credited to him. A couple of the 4 co-writes are with the tour & production managers. The two songs that were studio ready, the retrospective title track & “You Love The Thunder” are both good enough to enter the Jackson Browne canon with a bullet. Recorded onstage there’s more power & a little more disorder in the house than his fluid studio recordings. “Running On Empty”, track 1, side 1, sets both the tone & the quality for the sometimes surprising record that follows.

 

 

Related imageDanny “Kootch” Kortchmar must have played in a 1,000 bands (including the Fugs!). He’s made his own solo albums, produced big names, appeared in “This Is Spinal Tap” too but his reputation abides as a consummate, dependable sideman. He played Jackson a song of his about the musician’s life & “Shakey Town” was recorded within days. It perfectly fits the ethos of “Running On Empty”, Browne’s vocal certainly does the song justice & 40 years later it’s still a favourite of mine. Here is Danny performing the song with his band. To my old ears, this is how American Rock goes, I love this clip.

 

Browne’s insistence on presenting an honest document means that the Sex (well, masturbation on “Rosie”) & the Drugs are covered alongside the Rock & Roll. With hindsight he may regret including a way past his bedtime cover version of Reverend Gary Davis’ “Cocaine”, a song the Rev learned in 1905. This was tour life for the LA cowboys in the 1970’s. There were 2 buses, 1 for the band,  1 for the crew & the cocaine had its own truck. The final track “The Load Out”, a song for the roadies, segues into “Stay”, a golden oldie by Maurice Williams & the Zodiacs. Now anyone with a familiarity with these ramblings will already suspect that I am something of a Soul Purist so I’m not always well disposed towards anyone messing around with the classics. Anyhow, what I regarded as a a bagatelle made both the US & UK Top 20, his only British hit, so what the heck do I know?

 

 

I’ve checked for more than half the tracks on the record but I’m not leaving without playing just one more. In 1977 Jackson made an appearance on the debut LP by singer Valerie Carter  who was assisted in the recording by Little Feat’s Lowell George, one of the great guitarists & a writer with a similar talent for capturing tenderness without sentimentality. The trio wrote the yearning, simple “Love Needs A Heart” & it’s just a gorgeous thing. On “Running On Empty”, his biggest selling album, Jackson Browne documents the myth & his own reality of life on tour. Less heroic than his previous work, tougher than the rest, his accurate, undisguised, human reportage produced an outstanding, abiding record. If you don’t know it then well, you know what to do.

 

 

 

 

An Outlaw For My Love (Galveston)

I’ve not seen too many memorable movies this year, maybe I’ve not been looking hard enough or maybe I’m satisfied by repeated viewings of “Free Fire”, Ben Wheatley’s spirited shoot-em-up which continues to hit the spot every time. Sunday night’s viewing was “Galveston”, a thriller based on a novel by Nick Pizzolato the creator/writer of the TV series “True Detective”. Series 1 of TD with Woody Harrelson & Matthew McConaughey was so damn good that Nick P gets a pass for the disappointment of series 2 (one more detective didn’t make it 50% better). Good thing too because “Galveston” is a blast, here’s the trailer.

 

 

Related imageWe all know that Ben Foster, after a star turn in “Hell or High Water” (2016) & a cameo in last year’s “Hostiles” is the man for the job when a criminal with more than a touch of weltschmerz is required. He’s Roy Cady, an enforcer for a New Orleans sleazebag (Beau Bridges), who rescues Rocky, a teenage hooker, while killing some guys who would rather be killing him. Their road trip to Texas is anxious, grim, violent & very affecting, complicated by Roy’s conscience, Rocky’s naivety & a 3-year old sister in tow. Foster is rough & not always ready for the what comes his way & he really is a very good actor. Rocky is played by Elle Fanning who does make a lot of films. This year there has already been the awful “How to Talk to Girls at Parties” & the acceptable “I Think We’re Alone Now”. I’m not complaining, the combination of her beauty & her youthfulness make for an individual screen presence. Her damaged doxie will, like her role in 2016’s “The Neon Demon”, endure when she has outgrown her girlishness & is in competition for parts with her big sister Dakota.

 

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star & director

Pizzaloto, unused to the reduced role of a screenwriter, uses a pseudonym in the credits. His chosen nom de plume, Jim Hammett, surely a tip of the fedora to Thompson & Dashiell whose noirish pulp fiction the film wishes to emulate. The director is Melanie Laurent, the French actor best known for being Shosanna in QT’s “Inglourious Basterds”. Her taste & restraint in the story telling avoids the easy cliches which films that aspire to be Film Noir often fall back on., Her empathy with actors has produced two fine performances. Foster is Bogart tough, he’s someone I want to see more of & if Elle Fanning, just 20 years old, continues to improve as an actor then she will be special. The scene where she is  quietly singing Big Star’s “Thirteen”  (played over the closing credits) to herself is very cool, memorable & perfect. When “Galveston” ends you need a bit of quiet to think about what you have just watched. I can’t say the same about many of the films I have seen this year.

 

 

 

 

 

New Stuff Has Come To Light (November)

Image result for o'jays above the lawWell the first thing is that there is a new single from the O’Jays! That’s the legendary O’Jays to us, the vocal group whose recordings with Gamble & Huff for Philadelphia International in the early 1970’s made them a contender for the heavyweight title belt held for so long by the Temptations. There’s quite a bit of “Then” about “Above the Law” & there is a whole lot of “Now”. That upcoming mix of the records of the year will surely have to include this…

 

 

I wrote about the O’Jays here & my regard for the group has grown with repeated viewings of a stunning 2016 session round at Daryl Hall’s (off of …& Oates) gaff. In the piece I extolled the powerful lead vocals of Eddie Levert while not giving enough credit to his partner Walter Williams, an absolute dude in the “Soul Train” years &, despite a long battle with multiple sclerosis, still straight from the fridge on an elevating update of the 1976 hit “Used Ta Be My Girl”. With hands in pockets, toothpick firmly in place he is as insouciant as you could never be & absolutely on it. Walter is quite a man.

 

 

Image result for o'jays 2018Eddie is now 76 years old, Walter 75, friends since childhood. The third member, Eric Nolan Grant, has been around for just the past 20 years. “Above the Law” is the lead for a planned valedictory LP “The Last Word” before retirement. It’s a polemic about the way things are in the USA, same as it ever was, as angry & assertive as “For the Love of Money” (1973) & 1975’s “Rich Get Richer”. Steve Greenberg’s S-Curve label is backing the project & one of his roster, the inimitable Betty Wright, has contributed to the writing & production. Ms Wright has been involved in so much good music for so many years that it has to be her talent rather than coincidence. I believed what the O’Jays had to say back then & they are still damn right. I for one will be joining hands & getting on board the Love Train for one final time when the album comes around.

 

 

We all know that “The Greasy Strangler” (2016) is one of the most striking films of recent years. It’s an entertaining helter-skelter mix of gratuitous violence, unlikely nudity, profanity,  bad jokes in poor taste & worse food. The journey from “what the hell am I watching?” to “I must dig out my video tape (ask your parents) of “The Toxic Avenger”” is one worth inflicting on folk who you hope will not think less of you & will still be your friend after it. This is the movie that has introduced “Hootie Tootie Disco Cutie” into every day conversation, well my day anyway.

 

Image result for an evening with beverly luff linnSo, director Jim Hosking’s new film “An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn” (2018) has got to be seen & it has been. This time there’s less gross-out, less grease (Oh No!) but Hosking’s cinematic world is still populated by inarticulate social outcasts, even grotesques. It’s off the beaten path, David Lynch lives nearby but DL can be too serious for Jim who prefers to go for the laughs. The bigger budget hasn’t, thankfully, been spent on the script, still awkward, deadpan & full of non-sequiturs, but on attracting proper actors. Aubrey Plaza, “always watchable”, is small town femme fatale Lulu Danger who leaves her husband (Emil Hirsch) with Colin (Jemaine Clement off of Flight of the Conchords, he’s good) seeking “One Magical Night Only” with the titular Beverly (Craig Robinson) &…er…that’s it. See this movie if only for the sight of Beverly, garbed in Sir Walter Scott kitsch, reviving the old Scottish folk song “Why Did I Ever Become A Football Referee?”

 

I do hope that Hosking gets to make more films. They are not for everyone, an IMDB review (I know…why?) was disturbed by the poor personal hygiene of his characters! He has an original, idiosyncratic sense of comedy which I find to be interesting, most entertaining & memorable but then, I’m funny that way.

 

 

Image result for bill ryder jones yawnThere are only a couple of preview tracks available from the new Bill Ryder-Jones LP “Yawn” which is released on Friday November 2nd. It’s been 3 years since the triumph of “West Kirby County Primary” & the videos for both “Mither” (see above) & “And Then There’s You” certainly enhance the anticipation of a new collection of melodic Merseyside melancholia from B R-J. Low key contemplative vocals (the influence of Bill Callahan?) matched with a sure, solid wall of guitars, Indie with a touch of Psych, makes, to my ears, an attractive mix. There are British singer-songwriters around who sing quietly, evoke the name of Nick Drake & want to be considered as sensitive souls. Screw that noise, “Yawn” is his 4th album since leaving the Coral, should, I hope, confirm that Bill’s skills as a writer & as a producer continue to develop.He’s someone who thinks imaginatively & considerately about the something he has to say. I’m looking forward to next Friday.

Glad Every Night That You Treated Her Right (Roy Head)

Your eyes belong in a tiger’s face, your nose straight from a forgotten race. Your hair is straight, it won’t curl, you ain’t never gonna be my girl…

 

 

Just Wow!…Always. If “Your (Almost) Tuff” had been recorded by the Seeds or the Standells it would be track 1, side 1 on the “Now That’s What I Call Garage Rock” collection. Perhaps the Cramps could have covered it on “A Date With Elvis” (1986) & made a great album greater. On its release in 1966 Roy Head was hardly an obscure artist, he had enjoyed a very successful 1965, A hit big enough (4 million sales worldwide) for him to now be considered a one-hit wonder, even though two following singles both made the US Top 40, had put his name in the frame. With diminishing returns this sensational psychobilly surge failed to trouble the Top 100. One that got away & not appearing on an album, almost 30 years passed before the track was included on a “Best of…” compilation.

 

Related imageRoy Head’s high school band, the Traits, were quite a deal in Central Texas. Formed in 1957 the singer was still only 18 when, two years later, they had their first regional hits. Roy & the Traits played straight ahead energetic rockabilly, just the sort of music a group of Texan teenagers should be playing in the late 1950’s. Check out “One More Time”, credited to all 6 Traits, two & a half minutes  that you immediately want to hear again. The addition of two saxophones added extra punch & a bigger sound for tracks such as “Linda Lou”. They were attracting attention from bigger players, in 1965 they signed with producer Huey Meaux whose operation was based at Gold Star Studios in Houston. It was there that the super smash hit was made.

 

 

Image result for roy head treat her right“Treat Her Right” is an impressive blast, distinctive & exciting enough to make #2 on the US charts at the height of Beatlemania (“Yesterday” was the toppermost) in a Top 10 which included the Lovin’ Spoonfull, The McCoys & the Ramsey Lewis Trio. The existing TV clips of Roy, without the Traits, lip-synching to the song, are of low definition & he is giving it plenty, rubber legs & all.I can’t imagine how wild he could be with a full band, in a packed sweaty Texas club but sometimes I do just that. I have never been too comfortable with the tag “Blue-Eyed Soul” but I do know that “Treat Her Right” was pretty fly for a white guy.

 

The later records were released under just Roy’s name or by the Roy Head Trio which included bass player Gene Kurtz, co-writer of the hit & composer of “You’re (Almost) Tuff”. The only LP that appeared was a collection of earlier recordings but single releases made in Memphis at Chips Moman’s American Sound Studios & back in Texas with Sir Douglas Quintet’s Doug Sahm, continued to be interesting. I don’t usually put so many links into these things but these tracks deserve a wider hearing, “Just A Little Bit” is less than 2 minutes long, give it a try.

 

 

In 1970 there was finally the time & money to make a proper Roy Head LP. Produced by Huey Meaux, “Same People (That You Meet Going Up, You Meet Coming Down)” is a fine example of Texas Rock & Soul, arrangements packed with blaring horns, spiky guitar, Gospel-tinged backing vocals & a solid rhythm section to support Roy’s strong vocals. In the next decade Roy turned to Country, enjoying 3 Top 20 hits on that chart.He continued to perform &, if the music was more restrained, I’m sure he always put on quite a show.

 

Image result for roy head“Treat Her Right” became an enduring & much covered song. Bruce Springsteen, young enough to be impressed by what Roy had going on in 1966, turns it into a show-stopper. When the almost forgotten catalogues of the original Rock & Rollers were resurrected & re-released the Traits’ brand of R&B influenced dynamism proved to be a very worthwhile listen. The band celebrated their golden anniversary with a reunion & election to the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. There was more interest when his son, Sundance, won the US TV show “The Voice” (whatever that is!). They performed together at the Grand Ole Opry, the song “Treat Her Right”. He’s a bit of a legend Roy Head & you can’t keep a good man down.

Randy Newman:Songwriter For Hire

I first became aware of Randy Newman (that’s the great) in the early months of 1967 when the Alan Price Set had a UK Top 5 hit with the lyrically dexterous “Simon Smith & His Amazing Dancing Bear”. Price’s previous group, his Rhythm & Blues Combo, had become the Animals who’s second single, the momentous British Beat interpretation of a folk standard “The House of the Rising Son” (1964), deservedly became a massive international success. The label of that 45 contained the words “Trad-arr:A Price”, an astute move on his part which triggered “musical differences” & his departure from the group soon after the first royalty cheques arrived.

 

Related imageThe seven-piece Alan Price Set didn’t write their own material, the debut LP, “The Price to Play” (1966), was a mix of the American Blues, R&B & Soul they played on stage. In a shift in style, on 1967’s “A Price on His Head” there were no less than seven Randy Newman songs. Four of these were included on Randy’s own eponymous debut LP released the following year. By 1968 it was becoming a given that if you needed a song which combined individuality, direct emotions & a dry wit then he was your man. The list of artists who selected from his catalogue was long, impressive & growing.

 

 

Randy, who dropped out of his music studies at the University of California, was joining the family business. Three of his uncles were established composers of film & TV scores. The most notable, Alfred Newman, won 9 Oscars for his soundtracks. He went pro when he was 17 & “They Tell Me It’s Summer”, a b-side to a Fleetwoods hit record provided financial encouragement to the aspiring songwriter.  I know now that Randy had written songs before “Simon Smith…”. I was not aware of the quality of the artists who had recorded his music & that he had written familiar songs that had been sizeable hits in the UK.

 

Image result for irma thomas anyone who knows what love isI didn’t know until recently that he has a co-credit for the incredible Irma Thomas song “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is (Will Understand)”. Imperial Records were based in Los Angeles, Newman’s hometown, & enjoyed much success through a connection with Dave Bartholomew, a major player in the development of New Orleans music. Young Irma already had a fine string of impassioned Soul ballads behind her when “Anyone Who…”, a co-write between Randy, aspiring Country singer Jeannie Seely, then a secretary at Imperial & two others who appear to have written little else, was paired with “Time Is On My Side” for a 1964 single. The latter proved ideal for the Rolling Stones brand of bluesy British Beat. The atmospheric, enchanting “Anyone Who…” has received greater recognition since it’s inclusion in an episode of Charlie Brooker’s “Black Mirror” series. Together they comprise one of the most desirable & satisfying 7″ plastic discs released in the decade. Click on the clip above because Irma Thomas was, & still is, quite something.

 

 

1964 was the year that Randy Newman’s name really started getting around. Established artists such as Bobby Darin, Lou Rawls & Jackie De Shannon picked up his songs. The most substantial, enduring title was “I Don’t Want to Hear It Anymore” given a dramatic interpretation by the consummate Jerry Butler, enjoying solo success after leaving the Impressions. A double A-side with “I Stand Accused”, there’s another covetable piece of vinyl. Over in the UK three Americans, the Walker Brothers were enjoying great popularity & the song was ideal for the expressive voice of Scott Walker. “I’ve Been Wrong Before” was a Top 20 UK hit for the Beatles mate Cilla Black &, in the  same year, appeared on “Ev’rything’s Coming Up Dusty” by Britain’s leading lady vocalist. Newman’s intriguing ballads & Ms Springfield were a great match. Her version of “I Don’t Want to Hear It…” was recorded for the impeccable “Dusty in Memphis” (1969). It makes the cut here because if you ever get the chance to listen to Dusty Springfield sing then take it.

 

 

Image result for gene pitney rolling stones tourGene Pitney had his biggest US successes in 1962. There were not only 2 Top 10 singles but “Rubber Ball” (Bobby Vee), “He’s A Rebel” (The Crystals) & “Hello Mary Lou” (Ricky Nelson) were his songs that you know by other  people.He lost a little direction though “Gene Pitney Meets the Fair Young Ladies of Folkland” (1964) is worth having for the title & cover. The two 1965 albums of duets with Country legend George Jones have worn very well too. His first UK hit, 1963’s “Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa”, Bacharach & David’s capsule soap opera, was an obvious quality item, A visit over here with Phil Spector,  hanging out with the Rolling Stones, recording an early song of theirs, made him kinda cool. His career revived in the US but he always seemed more popular in the UK. Two of his 11 Top 10 singles here were written by Randy Newman. “Nobody Needs Your Love (More Than I Do)” was another pinch of Jerry Butler, a quickened tempo, added orchestration & Gene’s trademark double tracked vocals gave him his usual hit. I probably have a preference for Jerry’s take but then if “The Ice Man” sang the weather forecast I would consider buying it.

 

“Just One Smile”, originally a B-side for the Tokens, a Doo-Wop group from Brooklyn, was Pitneyfied & added to his list of creditable hits. With a growing maturity & confidence Randy Newman began to develop a more individual style. Songs like “Tickle Me”, “So Long Dad”, “Mama Told Me Not to Come” & others displayed an original approach to the popular song, an acerbic wit & a slightly skewed view on Life through an assemblage of characters. He could still write those affecting, often slightly forlorn ballads & the queue to get a hold of his new songs got even longer. His own records were great then greater & don’t get me started on “Good Old Boys” (1974) because this is about Randy as a jobbing songwriter so…another time.

 

 

I was going to end this with the Nashville Teens & “The Biggest Night of Her Life”, a 1967 UK 45 which, for a couple of weeks I was convinced was headed for the charts. As I said there are songs that I know but I didn’t know Randy Newman wrote. Here is a version of “Just One Smile” by an absolute master of Chicago Soul & favourite of mine that I wasn’t aware of for years. It was recorded but failed to make the cut for Walter Jackson’s LP “Speak Her Name” (1966). Walter’s husky baritone, powerful & subtle, could make a grown man (that would be me) have a little something in his eye. Magnificent.

New Music For September 2018

Can it be 30 years ago that I was sat with the woman lucky enough to be my companion in the well-appointed foyer bar of one of the concrete fun palaces on the South Bank of the River Thames eagerly awaiting a concert by the pioneering master trumpet player Don Cherry? I was raised to be respectful & to listen when someone is talking, notably good advice when you are hoping to make a good impression on the someone you have invited to share the evening. I admit that I was a little distracted when a very striking woman, Don’s step-daughter Neneh, stood nearby. I knew about Neneh from her time as singer with Rip Rig + Panic who released 3 LPs of Post Punk, Jazz Funk, did a couple of sessions for DJ John Peel & appeared on “The Young Ones”, the preferred TV comedy of the day for the nation’s youth.

 

Image result for neneh cherry rolling stoneBy the end of the year a lot more people knew who Neneh Cherry was. “Buffalo Stance”, a sparky, sparkling confection of Rap, R&B, Beats & sass, the first single from her solo LP “Raw Like Sushi”, was the brightest of modern Pop & in the UK Top 10. She appeared on Top of the Pops, almost 7 months pregnant, in stretch Lycra & she looked as good as she sounded. The single repeated its success in the US & in 1989 her music, videos & image were everywhere while she was celebrating the birth of her daughter Tyson with her husband-collaborator Cameron McVey.

 

 

 

It was 3 years before Neneh made the follow up record. “Homebrew” was good, not as commercially successful & I guess that she was not too concerned. Neneh was never too bothered about being a Pop star & since then she has worked when, where, with whoever she wanted & the music has always been interesting. The one you know is the trilingual “7 Seconds”, a 1994 hook up with Youssou N’Dour, a big hit all across Europe. The list of her collaborators is long, varied & very impressive.

 

Related image“Kong” is her first release since 2014’s “Blank Project” LP. It’s a serious , empathic commentary on the state of things, on the world in a state, “Goddamn guns and guts and history and bitter love still put a hole in me”. Back in 1988 Massive Attack’s 3D contributed to her song “Manchild”. He returns to co-produce with Four Tet & the talented pair have created an atmospheric Trip-Hop soundscape. “Kong” has more than a little of Massive Attack about it & that’s better than a good thing as there is not enough of that about nowadays. I put a friend on to the accomplished video & she was not just surprised that Neneh was still making music but also commented on how good she looked. Now I’m much too evolved to remark upon a woman’s appearance but I’m with Gigi on this one.

 

 

Extended exposure to “Joy as an Act of Resistance”, the powerful new collection of Punk pique by Idles, has created the need for a little time to chill so that I’m not gobbing on Life like it’s still 1977. The current soundtrack to the restoration of my equilibrium is “Lifted”, the new album, his fifth, by Israel Nash, a musician living in Texas whose work has passed me by for almost a decade. Seems like I’ve been missing out on something good.

 

Image result for israel nash liftedI became aware of Israel Nash Gripka, as he was then, with his debut “New York Town” (2009). The standout track “Pray For Rain”  sounded like the best track that John Fogerty had never recorded, I liked it but y’know, I have Credence records. Israel has got his band together, moved to Dripping Springs, Texas where he makes his records at home. He likes a full, chimeric, light-Psych sound. His mature lyrics are matched to mostly mid-tempo melodies & that’s OK,on “Lifted” perhaps the sum of the parts is greater than the whole. Israel still can write a mean Neil Young tribute, the harmonies evoke Crosby, Stills & Nash, even the Beach Boys on “Sweet Springs”. His influences are easily identified & they are all the good ones. The swooning pedal steel brings to mind the first Jerry Garcia LP & there’s not a lot better than that. While you click on the terrific “SpiritFalls” I’m putting the new Calexico on hold for 2015’s “Silver Season” then working my way back through his catalogue. This is the kind of Americana I like.

 

Neneh Cherry may have my vote for the single of the year so far but here at Loosehandlebars Mansions we welcome the opinions of others & a good friend of the blog, Raymond Gorman, formerly of That Petrol Emotion, now a member of The Everlasting Yeah, has been canvassing support for this. I think that Raymond may be one of the dancers in this video…Yeah, he wishes.

 

 

Image result for chaka khan magazine coverOnly good things can be said about Chaka Khan. In her early twenties when the group she fronted, Rufus, broke through you watch her performances on “Soul Train” & she is a hootie tootie disco cutie, magnetic, a talent & a star. Here’s the first hit “Tell Me Something Good”, before the group became “…featuring Chaka”. I recently made a mix of 80’s R&B for a mate, helping to make the day in his cab a little funkier, & her super smash with Prince’s “I Feel For You” was an obvious ingredient. I had to match it with the abiding “Ain’t Nobody” by Rufus, a permanent fixture on our house party tapes in that decade.

 

Image result for like sugar chaka khan“Like Sugar” is the Great Khan’s first track for a decade, the lead for a new album. It’s recorded with Switch, formerly off of Major Lazer & producer for many, including M.I.A. The song proves that Old School or New School, what the heck’s the difference as long as it’s got the Funk. There’s a heavy sample of the Fatback Band/Sarah Ruba version of “(Are You Ready) To Do the Bus Stop” & the all-dancing video will make you smile. If you have missed this up to now then get your groove on & remember what a fine Summer we had. There’s a Switch remix that’s worth a listen too. Ms Khan is, of course, a legend, just this week she performed at Aretha’s funeral. It’s great to have her around again.

 

I Know, I Know, I Know (Bill Withers)

Image result for bill withers just as i amBill Withers (that’s the great…) came late to making records. Born in 1938 in Slab Fork, West Virginia he joined the US Navy at 18 where he served 9 years before settling in Los Angeles, working a day job to finance his demo tapes while performing at night. His luck changed in 1970 when Sussex Records signed him to make an album. Sussex had a producer who was new to California but an old hand behind the studio desk. Booker T Jones, off of “& the M.G.’s”, had gotten tired of working too hard for too little financial reward at Stax in Memphis. He married Priscilla Coolidge, Rita’s sister, relocated & was looking for new challenges. For “Just As I Am” (1971) Booker T called in his old rhythm section Al Jackson (drums) & Duck Dunn (bass), Stephen Stills brought along some L.A. friends. The first single, “Ain’t No Sunshine”, you know it, sold over a million copies, made the US Top 10 & was awarded the Grammy for the Best R&B song of that year. Bill Withers, reluctant to quit his job making toilet seats for Boeing 747’s, became an unlikely & deserving star.

 

 

Image result for bill withers muhammad ali“Just As I Am” hits the ground running with the evocative, picaresque “Harlem”, “Ain’t No Sunshine” a sure-fire smash, the touching, universal “Grandma’s Hands” & the sheer class keeps on coming. Bill was no Soul shouter, his direct Folk-Gospel suitably framed in simple, driving arrangements with taut string flourishes. A cover of Lennon & McCartney’s “Let It Be” is more successful than Fred Neil’s “Everybody’s Talkin'” but it’s the mature plainspeak of his own lyrics that marks Bill Withers as an outstanding, individual talent. The sad & beautiful “Hope She’ll Be Happier”, a late-night broken hearted farewell to an ex, never fails to affect. This performance is from 1974, a highlight of a concert in Zaire arranged as part of the Ali – Foreman rumble. The cameras stay on the singer & his authentic Star Power is confirmed.

 

When Bill had to go to work at his new job he knew just the crew to to share the stage with. Keyboard player Ray Jackson had assisted him with those early demos. Ray’s fellow members of Charles Wright & the Watts 103rd St Rhythm Band, Benorce Blackmon (guitar), Melvin Dunlap (bass) & the inimitable drummer James Gadson all handed in their notice & joined Bill’s band. The evidence of just how good they were is right here & on the Y-tube there is a half hour show from 1972 which touches greatness. They all knew it too, enjoying laying down the coolest, in-the-pocket groove. They did it sitting down, imagine how good they would have been if they had stood up!

 

 

The band, with percussionist Bobbye Hall, recorded & produced the next LP “Still Bill” (1972) which hit the same spots & more. The modern day hymn “Lean On Me”, you not only know that tune but you know the words too, was a US #1 while the sensual “Use Me”, not just the hook of the year but one for all-time, peaked at #2. No-one else’s songs this time just great originals like “Who Is He (And What Is He To You)?”, a typically accurate encapsulation of jealousy covered most successfully by groups with female leads (Gladys Knight & the Pips, the Soul Children). The best tracks…it’s a list but I hear the joyous funk of “When I’m Kissing My Love”  & I’m singing it for days.

 

Image result for bill withers carnegie hallThe following year the Bill Withers gang released “Live at Carnegie Hall” & what a life-affirming disc that is. The hits are played, “Use Me” twice, & enthusiastically received by a full house. The singer’s & band’s performances have a little more drive & grit than on studio recordings & that’s nothing but a good thing. The 5 new songs include the empathic “I Can’t Write Left Handed” about a young man who lost an arm in the Vietnam War. Bill didn’t write polemics, didn’t involve himself with the politics of the day. His stories about himself & others contain a sensibility that is more enduring than strident sloganeering. “…Carnegie Hall”, with the long revivalist encore of “Harlem/Cold Baloney” is one of the great live albums.

 

 

Image result for bill withers posterThese three albums are the imperial phase of Bill’s career. He could take his seat at the top table of Soul alongside Marvin, Stevie, Curtis & others. After this the business of the music business started to get in the way. “+Justments” (1974) is a fine record, the last with his band & possibly a little rushed. Sussex Records was closed by the Inland Revenue & Bill was left hanging before signing with Columbia. In no way should his time with a major label be dismissed, the records are still warm & individual but a production gloss moves him away from his original sound & the company often rejected tracks while making inappropriate suggestions for material. Bill tells a great story about white “blaxperts” insisting that Elvis’ “In the Ghetto” was the song for him!

 

There were still successes. “Lovely Day” (1977) became yet another of Bill’s songs that entered the public consciousness. A collaboration with Grover Washington, “Just the Two of Us” won the Grammy for Best R&B Song in 1981. It’s not just the hits, on every record there are songs & vocal performances that deserved a wider hearing. In 1985, after a 7 year hiatus, he released an album including the slow jam “Something That Turns You On”. Some of the songs on “Watching You Watching Me” were ones that had previously been rejected. Bill had a life before touring, recording & promoting product & now, happily married with a young family, he stepped away from the business & rarely recorded again.

 

 

Image result for bill withers 2009In 2009 the documentary “Still Bill” brought the reticent star back into the public eye. It’s a portrait of a 70-something man who has lived a good life well & learned some stuff along the way. Bill Withers is not only a very, very nice man his domestic, grounded Zen wisdom, still unimpressed by the star-making machinery, marks him as an admirable person. A highlight of the film is when he joins guitarist Cornell Dupree onstage for “Grandma’s Hands”. Two maestros doing what they do to the delight of the audience, to myself & to pretty much everyone I know. Accolades have come Bill’s way, a Wonder (Stevie) & a Legend (John) assisted him in his induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. It is the four or five songs of his that everyone knows & others that we should know that mark him as an outstanding, abiding artist. The full documentary is on the Y-tube so if you have 70 minutes to spare. Hey, make sure you see it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music For Half Time

OK, there’s no football for a couple of days & while it’s probably not coming home the England team are still in Russia. I’ll be, like the rest of the country, shouting at the TV on Saturday afternoon, my neighbours will appreciate that it’s not my turn to host this time. Dan has only been in his house for a month, I’m sure that his new friends next door will be OK with the noise. Today is the sixth birthday of Loosehandlebars so let’s feature some of the music that has been filling the gaps between some very enjoyable World Cup matches.

 

 

Related imageThe new LP from Half Man Half Biscuit is titled “No-one Cares About Your Creative Hub So Get Your Fuckin’ Hedge Cut”…that’s a good start. It’s over 30 years now since the first 2 albums by HMHB were at the front of the stack & at #1 in the UK Indie chart. On “Back in the DHSS” (1985) & “Back Again…” (1987) Nigel Blackwell’s lugubrious commentaries on British popular culture matched to a spirited bit of Punk Rock were wry relief from the dole-drums of Thatcher’s Britain. Playing in the band got the boys away from daytime TV & declining to appear on “The Tube” because of a previous Friday night appointment with Tranmere Rovers confirmed that they walked it like they talked it. Maybe, just maybe, references to Fred Titmus, Nerys Hughes, Bob Todd (“99% of Gargoyles Look Like…”) & Len Ganley didn’t mean much outside of the UK but HMHB were making the most pertinent funny music sice the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band. Which of us here have not often called the mind the opening lines of “Dickie Davies’ Eyes”, “Mention The Lord Of The Rings just once more & I’ll more than likely kill you”. That’s so right.

 

Image result for half man half biscuitThe band still has a big enough following to play plenty of gigs & subsequent records have come to my attention when the band has been discovered by those younger than myself. There are always good songs & it’s not only “Restless Legs”, “Joy Division Oven Gloves” & “National Shite Day” (“There’s a man with a mullet going mad with a mallet in Millets”) that’s made Nigel a bit of a national treasure. On “No-one cares…” he’s still piercingly accurate about pretension, going on about football, “Swerving the Checkatrade”, “Knobheads on Quiz Shows” is self-explanatory. There are even a couple of  more poignant songs about ageing & loss. Great titles, better lyrics, British Folk Pop Punk, they do that better than anyone.

 

 

Image result for richard and linda thompson in concertOne of my favourite recent purchases (alongside a rather fine Popeye the Sailorman tee-shirt) is “In Concert, November 1975” by Richard & Linda Thompson. I can’t remember why I missed out on this tour because I loved the first 2 records by this pair & “Pour Down Like Silver”, the new album at the time, has become the one I play the most from an outstanding, enduring body of work. In 2007, 25 years after the Thompson’s professional & romantic separation, Island Records finally released this gem from a couple at the top of their game backed by an all-star band.

 

Image result for richard and linda thompson in concertThere are plenty of Richard & Linda classics, the extended versions of “Night Comes In” & “Calvary Cross” (all 14 minutes!) are even better than the studio versions. There are cover versions, Hank Williams, Buck Owens, Ricky Nelson, reflecting Richard’s interest in American Country as well as British Folk music. “Now Be Thankful” first appeared on “Full House”, the final LP Richard made with Fairport Convention. On that fine record it’s sung by co-writer Dave Swarbrick. I’m an enthusiast of Fairport’s work, I know (& so do you) that Sandy Denny is one of the great vocalists but when Linda sings & Richard plays resistance is futile. I just kick back & enjoy some of the most beautiful, emotional music that I am aware of. This spectacular rendition took my breath away, touched my heart & opened my wallet.

 

 

Image result for one fast move or i'm goneThe weather’s been great here this past week, how about you? Time to dig out the past feelgood hits of the Summer to be enjoyed sitting outside with a cold beverage, a refreshing bit of green & good conversation. There’s been, of course, plenty of Reggae, Marvin & Tammi’s “United” always hits the spot & every Summer, however fleeting, since 2010 “One Fast Move or I’m Gone: Kerouac’s Big Sur” has been a fine accompaniment to warm evenings. Ben Gibbard (Death Cab for Cutie, Postal Service) & Jay Farrar (Uncle Tupelo, Son Volt) didn’t seem to the most likely pairing, brought together by a mutual respect for Jack Kerouac & producing an album of, mainly Farrar’s, songs. This is not Beat poetry & anyway I’m more a Steinbeck man myself, it’s a fine collection of modern Country Rock, a fresh take on the music I’ve enjoyed since the late 1960’s.

 

Right, I’m away to order a Gareth Southgate waistcoat from Amazon. Happy Birthday to the blog & bring on Sweden!